Due to the detection of the exotic pest tomato potato psyllid in Western Australia, emergency movement restrictions have been introduced to prohibit the importation of hosts from the Solanaceae and Convolvulaceae families into other states and territories of Australia. This directly effects well-known products like potatoes, tomatoes, capsicums, eggplants and sweet potato.

Tomato potato psyllid nymph and adults on a leaf. Nymph cases also pictured. Photo: Pia Scanlon, DAFWA Entomology

Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia

Biosecurity alert: Tomato potato psyllid

The Department of Agriculture and Food, WA (DAFWA) is working with the WA horticulture industry to respond to the detection of tomato potato psyllid, an exotic plant pest. Tomato potato psyllid attacks a range of plants including potato, tomato, eggplant, capsicum, chilli, and tamarillo, along with sweet potato.

The psyllid has been confirmed in the Perth metropolitan area in commercial and residential properties, and retail outlets. A small number of detections have been made outside of the metropolitan area including Gingin, Yarloop and Busselton.

Click here for more information, including a video about how to check your vegetable patch (external link, Department of Agriculture and Food WA)


Notices from some states and territories of Australia

Tomato potato psyllid nymphs on the under side of a tomato leaf. Photo: Pia Scanlon, DAFWA Entomology

Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

Queensland Industry alert – Tomato potato psyllid found in Western Australia

The Queensland DAF is undertaking surveillance of Queensland crops from the Solanaceae and Convolvulaceae plant families. The tomato potato psyllid affects horticultural crops and is also capable of transmitting the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum, which causes the devastating plant disease known as zebra chip in potatoes.

As a result, movement restrictions will now apply to solanaceous and convolvulaceous plants or plant material and associated media, machinery or equipment coming into Queensland, unless they meet certain conditions outlined in the Movement Control Order.

More information (external link, Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries)


Tomato potato psyllid next to a five cent piece. Photo: Pia Scanlon, DAFWA Entomology

NSW Department of Primary Industries

Tomato potato psyllid current situation

In response to the detection of tomato potato psyllid in Western Australia, NSW DPI has imposed restrictions on the importation of host plant material (including fruit), used agricultural machinery and used packaging, effective immediately.

More information (external link, NSW Department of Primary Industries)


Primary Industries and Regions South Australia

Exotic Plant Pest: Tomato Potato Psyllid and Zebra Chip

Biosecurity SA has implemented a new Condition 17 of the Plant Quarantine Standard South Australia, imposing restrictions and prohibitions on hosts in the solanaceae and convolvulaceae families. This directly effects well-known products like potatoes, tomatoes, capsicums, eggplants and sweet potato.

More information (external link, Primary Industries and Regions, SA)


Agriculture Victoria

Tomato potato psyllid

Restrictions apply for the importation of tomato potato psyllid host material into Victoria. A legislative Order places restrictions and conditions on the importation of materials which may carry the pest into Victoria. The Order is available on the Victorian Government Gazette website. Host material includes:

  • plant or plant products belonging to the family Convolvulaceae or the family Solanaceae. This includes sweet potato, capsicums, tomatoes, eggplants and potatoes; and
  • any agricultural equipment or packages used in the cultivation, processing, packaging or transport of these plant or plant products.

More information (external link, Agriculture Victoria)